MORE

Resolutions, An Allegory for the Blushing Bride

Once the champagne buzz has worn off and the early morning sun creeps in signalling the start of New Year’s day, we are confronted once again by an age old expectation: creating resolutions. There are two kinds of people; first, let’s begin with the optimists. These are the people who see resolutions as a sort of platform for rebirth — a chance to “wipe the slate clean” and construct the life they have always wanted for themselves without any past blunder regurgitating itself on the blank canvass lain out in front of them. Then, we have the pessimists, or, to be less blunt, the realists. This category of people is more diverse than those of the optimists — a true pessimist may simply assume that everything will go wrong no matter what assumption they set for themselves, while the realistic pessimist will simply believe that some goals are not achievable given the fickle nature of life’s happenings.

 

This year, evidence to the contrary, I’m vying for the optimist. Yes, that’s right, all those hopeful dreamers, idealists and resolutions makers alike may actually be onto something. A forward apology to those rational minded realists ostensibly rolling their eyes behind their computer screens — practicality is necessary in so many facets of life. But, as 2017 rears it’s seemingly ugly head in the wake of it’s predecessors travesty, a little optimism in the form of resolutions couldn’t hurt. And, as wedding season rolls around, we are especially applauding the tenets of the optimistic resolution makers. Here’s why:

 

  1. To project success

 

Have you ever been told in your days at university that creating a “five-year plan” was a surefire way of guaranteeing a successful career? Professors and advisors alike, while rigid in their expectancies for structure, may just hold the key to fulfilling life goals. Establishing a list of goals, so long as they are tangible, provides the mind with something worth pursuing. Let’s reframe this: congratulations, you have just become engaged! After the initial rush following the proposal comes the overwhelming task of planning the wedding and mentally wrapping your head around the notion of marriage — and all it entails. At this point, it becomes essential to envision everything you hope your wedding day will deliver. For example, if you desire your wedding to take place at a specific wedding venue, realise this vision in any way that is accessible to you — be it writing, drawing, visual projection — and manifest this in real ways.  Pursue these resolutions doggedly, and see what comes to fruition. You’ll find that attaining motivation becomes effortless once you’ve solidified a goal. Outside the context of the wedding itself, projections of success, a result of creating resolutions, are essentially what contour your life.

  1. To lead a more organised life

 

This one’s simple: listing achievable goals organically leads to a more organised lifestyle. Let’s establish this with another example: imagine that one of your resolutions is to be able to run for one hour straight before the day of your wedding. To achieve this goal, you have to compartmentalise your time. When and during what time of day will you begin training? How often will you train? What is the deadline for this goal to be realized? In order to answer these question, organisation is imperative. By allotting time into a fixed schedule, your mind is able to function more efficiently because it is working under a compartmentalised method. As a result, all other dishevelled pieces of your life will, naturally, be drawn together like pieces of metal to the magnet of your minds eye.

 

  1. To establish peace of mind

 

An organised mind is a happy mind. Once you’ve set the expectations for your year, and, more broadly, your life, you can set the standards of your own version of happiness. If you are framing your resolutions with a wedding in mind, infuse these resolutions with the projection of all you want your special day to encompass. Your mind will thank you later.

Megan E. Ingraham